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THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



ANNUAL REPORT 
1962 



DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 



Publication No, 270 approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent, 



THE OTMOMEALK OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEP^RTVfSNT OF EDUCATION 
Owen Bo Kiernan, Commissioner 
DIVISION OF EMIGRATION A21D AFRICANIZATION 
lire. George g. Tattan - Supervisor of Social Service 



BOARD OF BE DIVISION OF E.llIG^TION AND ^ERiCANIZATION 
Tern Expires 

1963 Mrs. Helen Sutton, Belmont - Chairman 

1963 Mr. Peter Arlos, Pittsfield 

I965 Mrs. Edith Brickman, Boston 

19614 Mrs, Marian Bullen, Cambridge 

19oij Mrs. Clementina Langone, Boston 

I965 Mrs. Carol Offenbach, Melrose 



DISTRICT IMMIGRATION AGENTS 

Mr ? ffi? !' i?V " La, ' rCnCG Qffloe ' 301 Essex Street 

r # rl n ?° nahU0 " Fal1 PdVGr 0ffiCe > 51 Franklin Street 

r # Edl^JTl. " S P rin S fiGld Office, 235 Chestnut Street 

Mr. Edmund B. Meduski - Worcester Office, 7k Front Streo- 



;ot 



Italy 

Canada 

United States 

Portugal 

Poland 

Greece 

Ireland 

Germany 

Great Britain 

West Indies 

Cnba 

China 

South America 

Hungary 

Syria 

U.S.S.R. 

Lithuania 

France 

Central Americ 

Philippi nes 

Turkey 

Japan 



u 



8 S 363 (of which 5,hk9 were for Boston) 

5,181 

h, 819 

2,919 (of which 2,C08 were in Fall River) 

2,25U 
2,179 
1,913 
1,652 
1,322 
1,260 
1,060 

686 

661 

563 

528 

505 
169 
395 

388 

33U 
30U 

263 etc. 



It is interesting to note that the largest nationality we served was also 
the largest number of that nationality admitted as immigrants last year due 
mostly to legislation permitting reunion of families and dlose relatives. How- 
ever, no one type of service could be attributed to any one nationality as in 
all, we have had all types of services rendered from change of status to adjust- 
ment of the newcomer to living in the United States, It is interesting to note 
that of the Philippines noted, the majority was in change of status and for 
citizenship applications. This past year, we have had quite a number of Philip- 
pine born Servicemen whose status was changed to permanent residents. This 
affected those who had enlisted in the United States Navy or Coast Guard while 
in the Philippines, had continuous service with their units for some five years, 
who had married United States Citizens while in the United States and, who on 
discharge, faced return to the Philippines unless their status was adjusted to 
legally admitted aliens* In these cases, we c corresponded with the United States 
Consuls in Canada, after petition by the United States Citizen wife, and on 
acceptance of all necessary documents and clearances, an appointment was arranged 
at the Consulate, In all cases, the applicant was able to return to the United 
States the next day. Then, because of the length of service and honorable dis- 
charge of at least three years service in the Armed Forces, they were able to get 
naturalized as citizens very shortly after their return from Canada when a record 
for permanent residence was established for them 



LOCALITIES SERVED BY THE DIVISION 

The greatest number of services have been recorded from the cities where we 
maintain offices: Boston, 10,615; Worcester, 3,U91; Springfield, 2,132; Lawrence, 
2,273; Fall River, 1,57U - with Cambridge next, 1,561; Lowell, 1,106; Somerville, 
1,085; etc,, receiving applicants from nractically every community in the State, 



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ALIENS IN MASSACHUSETTS 

■ i K 

In the 1962 Alien Registration required by the United States Government, 
130, U62 aliens registered, in Massachusetts, some 2,000 more than last year and 
reflects the increased number of immigrants admitted to Massachusetts of which 
12,09i gave this State as their destination on entry last year. There are over 
three million aliens in the United States and Massachusetts still ranks as the 
Seventh state in number of non-citizens. Of these non-citizens, there are 
Canadians, over 30,000; United Kingdom born, 11,000; Italian, 17,000; Portuguese, 
13,000; Polish, 10,000; Irish, 7,000; and German born some 5, 800, etc. 

RELEVANT STATISTICS 

The past ten years have shown the largest group if immigrants admitted to 
the United States since 1929, and even though the McC.arran-Walter Act of 1952 
limited immigration so drastically, special legislation enacted to assist the 
refugees in 1953; and the several subsequent laws permitted 2,581,105 to come to 
the United States in the last ten years - of which 99>066 gave Massachusetts as 
their destination on arrival,, 12,091 immigrants admitted last year is the larg- 
est amount in any one year of the past ten. The breakdown of the Nationalities 
admitted are: 



Canada 


—1 


3,201 


Italy 


- 


1,U6U 


United Kingdom 


- 


1,153 


Germany 


- 


797 


Ireland 


- 


708 


Poland 


— 


129 


Scandanavian 


— 


267 


Greece 


_ 


2U0 


China 


•* 


116 etc. 


1,914.0 were destine 


id to 


Boston; 59 



FACTS FROM THE FEDERAL CENSUS REPORTS 

Foreign stock, as defined by the Census Bureau, is comprised of foreign born 
persons and natives born of foreign, or mixed foreign and native parentage. In 
the United States, one in each five United States residents is of foreign stock, 
according to the i960 census results. In Massachusetts, the so-called "foreign 
stock" is hO$ of the total population. 

Of the total population in the United States 179,325,671 - 3U,050.Uo6 
persons were counted as of foreign stock (9,738,113 foreign born and 2U,312,263 
of native birth with nne or both parents foreign born). 



- 3 - 



MASSACHUSETTS STATISTICS 
As recorded in i960 census, in the totals for Massachusetts: 
TOTAL POPULATION ,5,lU9,317 

Native Born, U,572,865 - 88.8$ 

Native parentage 3,091,008 •• 60% 

Foreign or mixed parentage . ,l,U8l, 857 « 28 e £>% 
Foreign born , . 576,U5>2 - 11.2$ 

Persons in Massachusetts of "foreign stock" are 2,058,309 or Uo$ of the total 
population of the State, The census breakdown of countries of origin for this 
is as follows: 



Country of Origin 



The State 



Canada 

Italy 

Ireland 

United Kingdom 

Poland 

U.S.S.R. 

Portugal 

Germany 

Sweden 

Lithuania 

Asia 

Greece 

Other Europe 

Finland 

Austria 

Other America 

France 

Not Reported 

Norway 

All Other 

Czechoslovakia 

Denmark 

Ne therlands 

Hungary 

Rumania 

Switzerland 

Yugoslavia 

Mexico 

TOTAL FOREIGN STOCK 



517,236 

311,053 
276,166 

193,137 
136, 9U2 
129,386 
95,328 
51, 7U8 
51,101 
U0.921 
holUlh 
3U,007 
19,050 
18,708 
17,089 
16,278 
13, 108 
11,760 

10,501 

yi586 
6,388 
5,869 
5,317 
1,979 

3,351 
3,086 

1>U02 

1,305 
2,058,309 



- k - 



MOTHER TONGUE OF FOREIGN BORN IN MASSACHUSETTS 



For the 576,li52 foreign born persons listed in Massachusetts, the mother 
tongue is listed as follows: 



English 

Italian 

French 

Polish 

Portuguese 

Yiddish 

German 

Greek 

Swedish 

Russian 

Lithuanian 

Finnish 

Arabic 

Norwegian 

Chinese 

Spanish 

Dutch 

Ukranian 

Hungarian 

Danish 

Japanese 

Czech 

Slovak 

Rumanian 

Serbo-Croatian 

Slovanian 

All Other 

Not Reported 

TOTALS 



187,336 
81i, 8UB 
59,125 
33,199 
30,929 
26,i;17 
19,517 
U,U67 
1U,018 
11, 7U8 

lliU* 

5,003 
U,080 
3,192 
3,172 
3,010 
2,218 

1,955 
1,760 

1,1*79 

1,117 

880 

611 

5io 

hOO 

57 

16,828 

37,022 

576,1*52 



WHAT WE DO 

Our work takes in many aspects of social work with knowledge of community 
resources and technicalities of immigration and naturalization laws and proced- 
ures. Assisting the newcomer in adjustment and assimilation in a new country 
has been referrals to job opportunities, housing, school facilities, information 
regarding fulfillment of obligations as draft registration, notification of 
change of address and community resources for social activities. Also there is 
the last member of the family still left behind in the old country who could not 
emigrate with the family because of immigration laws, as a married daughter and 
her family. Even though in a separate household, reunion with the remaining 
members of the family causes great concern and anxiety. There are many types of 
cases involving the immigration laws in which we are concerned - the native born 



- 5 - 



citizen, with a child, whose husband to whom she has been married not too long, 
and is under investigation by the United States Immigration Service because he 
had entered the United States as a seaman ; the Cuban mother, herself in the 
United States two years j who had left behind her an 11 year old daughter whom 
she fears may be sent out of Cuba for indoctrination and for whom she asks assis- 
tance in application for waiver of Department of State's requirement so that she 
may enter the United States as a parolee; the Exchange Student married to a citi- 
zen who is Seeking a waiver of requirements so that he may not be separated from 
his wife and child for the two years, as originally required by the law under 
which he entered the United States. 

Other immigration problems concern reunion of families where relatives are 
on the quota list for many years and whose turn in the quota has not been reached; 
or the problem of the young man, himself in the United States a year, who returned 
to Italy, married and now is faced with a wait in the quota for some nine years 
until his wife's turn is reached - or he may get naturalized - or he may hope 
for new immigration legislation. 

Then there is the human element of a young man of the old country culture 
who married an American born young lady whose background is that of independence 
and who cannot understand her husband's allegiance to his family abroad to whom 
he must send funds for their assistance and who otherwise cannot agree with his 
wife to buy home furnishings, etc,, on the installment plan. Referrals to 
family counseling agencies in such problems have been made. 

Our Social Workers are registered with the United States Immigration Service 
and are permitted to appear in behalf of applicants at henrings, etc. It may be 
an appearance with the young man or lady who came to the United Stntes to visit>. 
fell in love and married a citizen of the United States and now seeks adjustment 
to permanent residency in the United States; or a further appeal in a similar 
case but where the United States Immigration Service had deemed it inadvisable to 
grant the privilege requested and where further appeal is possible. 

The statistical sheet attached recording our services covers all aspects 
giving information, filling necessary forms, appearances in behalf of the aliens 
at hearings at the United States Immigration Service, Not only must the social 
workers have knowledge of dealing with persons, they must be aware of the Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Law technicalities, procedures and prevalent new laws, 

OTHER SERVICES 

Under our heading of information, we list services of information on all 
problems of citizenship and immigration. We must explain the quota law and the 
long wait for certain categories in certain countries. The inquiries on citizen- 
ship come from persons ready to be naturalized and its affect on their children. 
We have inquiries from City and Town Registrar of Voters regarding citizenship, 
as well as Servicemen anxious to have their wives become citizens before being 
sent abroad, etc. We recorded 16,973 in this information category. 



-6 - 



1 r 






As we have listed, the form filling takes in many more aspects than filling 
a federal form as required for such an application. An application for registry- 
takes in many phases of evidence which had to be obtained, some with the help 
of the client, others by .corresponding with sources, or checking the directories 
to prove continuous residence in the United States for such an applicant - 
either to show his continuous residence since 192k in the United States or since 
19k0. This is the application required of persons for whom there cannot be 
found any record of legal entry into the United States if he entered since June 
30, 192U or June 28, 19U0, In most cases, satisfactory proof is produced and 
the applications finally successful, 

APPLICATIONS FOR CITIZENSHIP 

Although no longer is it required for an applicant to have a "First Paper", 
we filled 25>3 such applications* Many of them were for young men newly arrived 
in the United States who were joining the U, S e Armed Forces $ or for the ladies 
who needed this Declaration of Intention for the nurses examination; or for the 
doctors who needed it to take the medical examination,, 

6,361; persons were naturalized in Massachusetts last year. The Federal 
Report lists the nationalities as follows: All Countries, 6, 36I4.; Germany, 391$ 
Italy, 1*27, United Kingdom. 3865 Canada, 919$ Poland, U28$ Mexico, 10$ Greece, 
5U3$ Japan, 76$ Ireland, Uu3; Cuba, 39$ China, 91$ Norway, Sweden and Denmark, 
62$ Philippines^. 16; All Other, 1,3>33» Statistics snow the majority of appli- 
cants for naturalization are the comparatively newcomers, those who came to the 
United States since 195>£o It is these new immigrants who realize the value of 
belonging to a country of freedom. There are, however, a few residents fearful 
of the examination and who have been lulled to a state of apathy in their desire 
to become a citizen. Only at such times as elections and alien registration 
time are awakened to the fact. 

We have lists of classes available and encourage applicants to go to school 
to learn the necessary fundamentals to pass the examination for citizenship. We 
distribute to all applicants for citizenship that we assist, as well as to many 
schools, our booklet, "Questions and Answers in Preparation for Naturalization 
Examination" and Constitution of the United States, We distribute 10,000 such 
booklets yearly. 

We filled some 517 N-600 forms which are the applications for Derivative 
Citizenship. The Federal Office has initiated sending forms to the newly admit- 
ted citizen whose children are eligible for such application, M any are taking 
this step immediately instead of putting off the applications. Some of the 
applications were for those who wanted to register to vote in their new city of 
residence and had to show the Registrar proof of his citizenship gained tnrough 
his parent. The filling of these forms not only embodies getting and putting in 
correct information so that an arrival record may be located for the applicant, 
but in many cases entails the translation of foreign bir^h and marriage records, 
old passports, etc a 



- 7 - 



Forms N-U02 are applications used in applying for citizenship for a minor 
under 18 years of age, natural child of a United States citizen or is the 
adopted child of United States citizens , We filled 202 of these applications 
last year. 

IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS 

This subject might cover just the filling and notarizing of an affidavit of 
support to the problem of adjusting to a permanent resident in the United Stites. 
We filled and notarized 2,63>8 affidavits of support for relatives and friends 
and in behalf of persons seeking to come to the United States, This includes 
those coming to visit, but the majority were for permanenb residence. It may be 
an affidavit for so.aeone in Canada or Ireland or Great Britain where the sponsor 
will need to be ready to welcome tne new arrival very eoon, in a matter of a few 
months, to the United States since there is no quot^ problem^ or it may be for 
the brother or sister, or even parents, who had been waiting for years for their 
turn to come and now their turn has been reached from such countries as Italy, 
Greece, Turkey, Palestine, etc. We have forms that we have mimeographed for 
this service and have had many requests for them. 

In addition to quota problems, the problem of having relatives come from 
Iron Curtain countries is multiplied. Occasionally a close relative, the mother, 
the father and even a sister (who had been sent to Siberia and now returned) has 
been finally granted permission to leave such countries as Latvia,, Estonia, 
Lithuania, From such countries in the past year we have had perhaps five persons 
come. In such cases, the initial step must be the application in the Russian 
language, as well as English, to be presented to the authorities abroad in the 
request for permit to depart. We have made many such applications for persons, 
but very, very few have been successful. One of our applicants is a lady who had 
fled from the Communists in Lithuania in 19hh with her husband and two children. 
Her husband was caught at the border and taken to work digging trenches. The 
lady and two children fled to Germany where they lived in a German Disn' 1 aced 
Persons Camp and finally came to the United States, Now, although she is a citi- 
zen of the United Stages, the son a graduate of an Engineering School and the 
daughter a prospective teacher, all efforts to have the husband come to join the 
family have been in vain. The final reply from officials abroad where her 
husband seeks an exit permit, is that the lady would be given the privilege to 
return to her hometown and her husband! II 11 

Another document we make in a foreign language is ':he assurance required by 
the Polish authorities before a passport is issued abror.d„ This document^ 
notarized in our office, legalized by the Polish Consul^ is then sent abroad for 
the applicant to present in his application for passport to travel to the United 
Sta tes 



— 8 «- 



CHANGE OF STATUS 

The change r f status category includes persons in temporary status in the 
United States who desire permanent residence. Many of them have been for 
Canadians on a visit to the United States and for Cubans in temporary status for 
whom we must initiate procedure and correspondence with consuls, assemble neces- 
sary personal documents (with translation of those in foreign languages) and 
finally get an appointment with a Consul so that the person departs temporarily 
from the United States and gets the visa and returns for permanent residence in 
the United States* Some persons have changed from visitor to student status in 
the United States and for these applicants, we have had to have a sponsor make an 
affidavit of support, as well as execute the necessary forms, etc. 

CUBANS 

The plight of the Cubans still continue. Daily the Cuban Refugee Emergency 
Center in Miami, Florida records new arrivals as some are able to flee to freedom. 
It is estimated that of the 122,000 recent Cuban arrivals, some 23,000 have been 
resettled outside of Florida under the sponsorship of voluntary agencies* Massa- 
chusetts has received some 2, §00 through the sponsorship of several voluntary 
agencies, Church sponsored and otherwise* Although the largest group has settled 
in the vicinity of Boston, cities in the North Shore and other surburban areas 
have received some. The problems of adjustment for them has been like all the 
other nationalities. 

We have assisted some ninety applicants in requesting waivers of documents 
from the Department of State in the hope of having some close family member 
granted this privilege. It has been the general experience that even when the 
Department of State grants the waiver, the person in Cuba must still wait some 
six months before the necessary transportation can be had for entry into Miami, 
In 70 cases, we have initiated change of status applications for Cubans by cor- 
responding with the Consuls in Canada, filing the necessary papers, making the 
appropriate translation, etc., and finally an appointment arranged for that 
person to journey to Canada, On his return, he is a legal resident in the United 
States for permanent residence. Such applicants usually desire this status, 
necessary in their occupations as professionals where licenses may be required 
and where citizenship is necessary, or for travel in business, 

NEWCOMERS 

The Federal Office continues their service of sending to this office the 
names of the immigrants destined to Massachusetts, To each family we send a 
letter of welcome and offer of assistance of our services. Totally, 5,17C new- 
comer letters were sent last year, 2,537 requests came for our assistance, the 
majority affecting general assimilation into life in the United States such as 
job oppQi-fciiniJjQs 4 where to register for the draft, schools, where to get the 
proper cards f or -changEi of axWre&s notification. Immigration questions were 



- 9 - 



were second with many inquiring as to how reunion with immediate family members 
might be accomplished. Some inquiries were for information on citizenship. We 
assisted many in filling the necessary forms to register as an alien, as required 
of all aliens to do during the month of January, A number of them had not • 
received their alien registration cards because they had moved since they had 
arrived and with uhe filing of the proper notification, cards were sent to them. 

We are fortunate to have several social workers who have knowledge of a 
foreign language to whom newcomers have come and been able to tell their problems 
in their native language and get the understanding of experienced workers to 
assist them into early adjustment, so important in living in the United States. 
Our only wish is that maybe in the next grant of the budget might be included 
sufficient funds to have reinstated two such positions of social worker lost by 
retirements - two years ago - of experienced social workers, 

COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES 

The Division cooperates with social agencies, public and private. We have 
inquiries and referrals from the Public Welfare Di.v-isj.on, Social Security Offices, 
all for whom we have translated documents from foreign languages • Some Registrar 
of Voters have called on us for technical information regarding citizenship. Our 
relationship with the various sponsoring agencies working with the refugees, and 
most recently the Cubans, has been most cooperative and mutually helpful. The 
relationship with the Adult Civic Education groups, both with the Supervisors and 
the State Director, continues. We are a member of the Committee for the Foreign 
Born of the United Community Services, Our relations with the Federal Immigration 
and Naturalization Service continues with cooperation and assistance from that 
Service, 



SUMMARY 

In the past year, only two major immigration bills were enacted by Congress 6 
One dealt with general changes or procedures and definitions in the Immigration 
Act of 195>2 and the other ; Refugee legislation providing for continued United 
States participation in the Intergovernmental Committee for European Migration 
and Maintenance of United States contribution to the work of the United Nations 
High Commissioner for Refugees, It is a permanent provision for admission of 
Refugees, controlled by outside factors, where United States will take 2$% of 
total number of Refugees emigrated to other countries , 

Many bills have been introduced into Congress, the majority of which recom- 
mend changes in the quota allocations and recommendations for unused allotments 
of quotas to be pooled and divided among areas having a backlog of applicants 
waiting for visas. 

It has been announced that the House Sub-Committee on Immigration is plan- 
ning to study the immigration problem from the point of view of American Economic 
and Population Trends, Recommendation of this Committee will, no doubt, have a 
bearing on what changes in the United States Immigration Laws the Committees will 
favor next year, 

- 10 - 



Changing laws, world affairs which bring many people from many lands bo 
our shores, will always pose a problem of integration and assimilation of peoples 
with different cultures. The Commonwealth, through this Division, has carried 
on this program designed to bring the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign 
origin into sympathetic and mutually helpful relations. Its importance is just 
as paramount now as it was when it was established - especially in these troubled 
times of cold war and propaganda from nations hostile to a democratic form of 
government, 

FALL RIVER OFFICE 

The Fall River Office, serving thirty-three localities in Southeastern 
Massachusetts, terminated its fiscal year with a total of 3,597 services rendered 
to 1,6^6 individuals. These figures do not record other services, such as tele- 
phone inquiries or newcomer letters sent to all the new arrivals. 

This newcomer letter plays an important role in this Division's operation. 
Like the Voice of America telling the peoples of the world how we live, work 
and play, this letter welcomes the newcomer to life in America, It explains that 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has a State Division of Immigration and Ameri- 
canization ready at all times bo assist them in their citizenship and immigration 
problems. Their response and expression of gratitude to these letters is most 
pleasing and only -when they write or have personal contact with this office is 
their name listed as a service rendered. 

The ethnic population of the Southeastern Massachusetts area differs some- 
what from other areas of Massachusetts Fall River and New Bedford are dominantly 
Portuguese strongholds. During the past few years, numerous changes in our 
Federal Immigration Laws enabled people of the Azores to emigrate to the United 
States, One such law was the Fayal, Azores Refugee Bill for Volcano Victims, 
Their sponsors, usually relatives or friends, are residents of the Fall River-New 
Bedford Area and it is only natural that the newcomer would locate in the South- 
eastern Massachusetts area. Their problems are twofold: A lack of education due 
to a weak program of educational facilities in their homeland during the past 
decades. They are aware that education is an important requirement for United 
States citizenship. Secondly, they are aware that in order to unite their 
family, United States citizenship is a must due to Portugal being a country with 
a very small quota. This office, together with the Adult Programs of Fall River 
and New Bedford, immediately stress upon the newcomer the importance of an edu- 
cation, A monthly list of applicants applying at this office for naturalization 
is forwarded to the office of the supervisors of Adult Education in this area. 
The purpose of this is to help these applicants prepare for the educational exam- 
ination which the Federal Government and the law requires. 

United States citizenship applications have^ and are at present, one of our 
leading services „ Petitions for naturalization in behalf of minor children have 
been on the upswing due to the fact that the parents desire to have their chil- 
dren become United States citizens as soon as possible* Certificate of Citizen- 
ship applications increased from the past year and overall a total of 337 citizen- 
ship applications were sent to the Federal Service during this past fiscal year, 

- 11 - 



The workload in immigration has more technicalities and difficulties and it 
is reasonable to expect that it is more time consuming than that of citizenship. 
There was an increase in immigration forms completed at this office during the 
past year. Citizens and aliens alike are aware that unless they complete a 
petition for issuance of immigration visa or an affidavit of support, it is un- 
likely that their relatives or friends will ever have the opportunity of immigra- 
ting to the United States. They have been educated to the immigration laws and 
to the complex tight quota system. Therefore, forms are completed in the hopes 
that someday their relatives or friends may qualify for an immigration visa and 
enter the United States as a newcomer and to a new way of life. 

Change of status cases and appearances at hearings before the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service are also an important function of our services. Some- 
times this type of case involves an extreme hardship or the family whereby a 
member may be required to depart from the United States due to a technicality of 
the severe immigration laws, and is thus separated from his family. Many times 
it is the breadwinner of the family who is the person in difficulty with the 
complex immigration laws In most cases, there is nothing criminal in his 
difficulties other than severe quota restrictions. Avenues of relief are explor- 
ed and it takes a trained Social Worker along with the District Immigration 
Agents to cope with this type of problem. The cooperation and help of the 
Federal Immigration and Naturalization Service is also required and in most cases 
what could be heartbreak and hardship usually has a happy ending. 

Other services rendered by the Division of Immigration and Americanization 
at Fall River during the past fiscal year have been many, such as travel informa- 
tion; writing letters for clients; notarizing documents; interpretations and 
translating foreign documents and applying for lost naturalization certificate. 
When a client loses his naturalization certificate, it appears that he is some- 
what worried and upset due to the fact that he has lost one of his most prized 
possessions which he cherishes at all times. We assure the client that he is in 
no difficulty and proceed to apply for a new certificate which he receives in a 
short period of time. 

The Fall River Office has at all times maintained friendly and working re- 
lationship with the Clerk of Courts; Police Authorities; Parole Boards; School 
Department; Employment Agency; Social Security Office; the Red Cross and all 
social agencies in the Southeastern Massachusetts area. 

LAWRENCE OFFICE 

On June 30, 1962, the Lawrence District Office tabulated a total of U,796 
services to clients for the preceding twelve months. This is an increase of U^U 
services over the previous fiscal year and represents l,6Ul individuals served. 
In the past four years, this office has recorded an increase of 31$ in services 
rendered. 

Over U8 countries were represented by clients serviced by the Lawrence Office 
during the past year, Italy was the country most frequently represented followed 
by Canada, Greece, -.he United States and Poland, in that order, 

- 12 - 



During the past fiscal year, the Lawrence Office assisted clients residing 
in 5>3 cities and towns throughout the Commonwealth. Tne majority of the clients 
were residents of Lawrence proper, Lowell, Haverhill and Methuen were also well 
represented. This Agent is continuing to visit Lowell on a weekly basis. 

In January 1962; the Lawrence District Office gave special emphasis to 
publicizing the Alien Address Report Program, The Lawrence and Lowell newspapers 
and radio stations responded enthusiastically to our requests for articles and 
spot announcements „ This Agent made a one-minute tape recording urging aliens to 
register. The tape was broadcast by the Lawrence Radio Station at least twice 
daily during the entire month. On January 20th, this Agent participated in a 
ten-minute interview over Lawrence Radio Station WCCM, Again, aliens were urged 
to register and this Agent was given the opportunity to discussrand oxplain 4 the 
types of services offered by the Division, As a result of the radio interview, 
many new clients availed themsel/es of the opportunity to seek assistance from 
this office, A great number of the schools in the area constantly refer to this 
office for information, advice and the completion of forms regarding the foreign 
and exchange students who are enrolled in those institutions. Attorneys and 
social workers of the various public and private agencies in the area, frequently 
call for information regarding the technical aspects of the immigration and 
naturalization laws. 

Information on immigration laws and procedures and information on citizen- 
ship were the two services most frequently requested during the last fiscal year. 
With one-third of our services "feeing rendered to natives of Italy and Greece, two 
countries whose quotas are heavily oversubscribed, we frequently were obliged to 
advise clients that quota restrictions are continuing to prevent reunion with 
relatives still abroad w We had many gratifying moments^ however, especially when 
clients would come in for the purpose of thanking us for our assistance and would 
proudly introduce us tu newly-arrived relatives. 

Beside the assistance given individuals with problems relating to immigra- 
tion and citizenship, this office rendered several other types of services during 
the last fiscal year: many letters were written on behalf of clients to govern- 
ment agencies within the United States and to United States Consuls abroad; all 
newcomers to the area served by the Lawrence District Office received letters of 
welcome from this office c They came with problems relating to health, employment, 
personal or social matters g We referred them to the proper resources. Transla- 
tion of documents written in Italian, French, German and Arabic was a service 
frequently rendered and clients who spoke the atove languages, but no English, 
were interviewed in their native tongue. 

Private, city, state and federal agencies in this area are continuing to 
give excellent cooperation to this office. 



-13 - 



SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

During the past fiscal year, 3*762 services were recorded for residents and 
former residents of the four western counties of the Commonwealth, serving 2,6^6 
individuals* This number, together with the great number of unrecorded sorvi/^es 
and the training of an assistant have made it a very busy year for us. 

Residents of forty-nine communities in our area requested services as did 
89 persons, former residents who had been contacted by our newcomer letters when 
they first entered the United States, 

Of the forty-nine major nationalities recorded, natives of Canada were the 
largest group served by us. They were' followed by natives of United States, 
Italy, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Poland, Wes u < Indies, Greece and Japan, 

As an essential' part of our work, helping new arrivals adjust to their new 
life in this country, 6U7 letters were sent to them exterding greetings and 
offering the various services of our agency to them An unusual number, this 
past year, sought special counseling in regard to their adjustment. We assisted 
one family through public and private agencies to obtain financial aid, as well 
as furnishings for their home. We assisted several persons to obtain waivers of 
immigrant visas so that they could bring their relatives from Cuba. We are now 
helping one of these families, five in number, recently paroled to the United 
States to make necessary arrangements to enter Canada to obtain visas for perman- 
ent residence in the United States, We prepared affidavits of support and for- 
warded them with correspondence to American Consular Service in order that 
persons here could sponsor relatives under the Act of September 26, 1961, As the 
year came to a nlose, we corresponded with the United States Consular Service at 
Hong Kong in reference to a Chinese refugee family. We assisted Canadians when 
they were temporarily visiting in the United States to arrange for definite 
appointments to appear at Montreal, Canada to obtain visas for permanent admis- 
sion to the United States, We rendered valuable assistance to three minor chil- 
dren of a Canadian family to obtain visas. As a result of filing applications 
for Certificates of Citizenship, the Immigration and Naturalization Service dis- 
covered that these children had no claim to citizenship although they had been 
admitted as citizens a few years ago. 

Although there has been a considerable falling off in applications for citi- 
zenship, a great number of those we assisted required special attention as they 
were either the spouse or child of a man serving in the United States Armed 
Forces assigned to overseas duty. 

Our cooperation with the representatives of the United States Immigration 
and Naturalization Service who come to Springfield en Fridays on a rotation 
schedule has been most cordial and mutually beneficial. We are always ready to 
make use of our technical knowledge and experience in assistance to clients in 
the many fceohnlc^lHiios of the Inurrigration and Naturalization Laws* 



-1U- 



On June 30 j ±962,, we completed eleven months at 235 Chestnut S+reet, 
Springfield, a newly constructed building leased by the State to house all State 
offices in our city e Very compline ntary remarks were made to us by all our 
clients in regard br the comfortable and clean, air-conditioned quarters we now 
occupy. Especially was this true of clients who, for many years, had visited us 
at our other locations* All were most appreciative of the free parking facili- 
ties available on the premised, 

WORCESTER OFFICE 

The Worcester Office assisted 3,420 persons with 5,1*32 problems and forms 
during the past year c 

A significant step was taken (also for our future activity) by the V/brccster 
Public School Syster in April 19 6? j when they registered with the United St ate n 
Immigration and Naturalization Service to accept foreign students on the hijh 
school level, Two students from Greece that ue were advising were faced with 
deportation unless this action was taken s They originally came to study in other 
parts of the United States, but then cane to live with relatives in Worcester, 
There are'nany higher institutions of learning for foreign students to attend in 
this area, but only a few on the secondary level. 

We have many inquiries by students concerning the possibility of remaining 
here as beneficiaries of first preference petitions or the spouses of United 
States citizens, but only a feu concerning the waiver :f the two years foreign 
residence requiremem; by exchange visitors since January 19&2, when the Immigra- 
tion and Naturalization Service adopted a stricter policy in granting these 
waivers. 

Pending legislation before Congress concerning any immigration matter 
results in numerous calls to our office by persons in this locality with rela- 
tives who would be affected. Cur office continues to fill a high percentage 
of the naturalization- applications. As an indirect comparison we completed 275 
lr-UOO and'F~l+02 forms , and 330 persons were sworn in aL Superior Court, 
'"force s ter , M assa chuse t ts • 

A picture and article in the Worcester Gazette on December 7, l c y62 titled,' 
"The Most wonderful Present' 1 , featured six children of one family, ages 5 to lu, 
nho became naturalised that day. Quoting the oldest boy on his answer to what 
is citizenship: "lis means that a little niece of the sidewalk, or part of that 
tree on the street will belong to me, and I will he an American". 

To point out the continuity of our casus, we assisted in bringing th father 
to this country, then the petitions for the children and wife, applications for 
naturalization and now he is petitioning for a married brother and his family. 

'The Agent has been reelected the recording secretary for the Konday Evening- 
Club, an organization in Worcester County for social workers and people in 
public contact work, thus helping to maintain our contacts with agencies, where 
we have referred our clients with their myriad perplexing situations. 



- 15 - 



For All Offices 

For fiscal year ending 6/30/62 



g 

Eh 

8 



STATI 



Pi 

I 

H 



TICAI. DEJTAIL 



Services 





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I. 



information __i_Z°§o L 

1. Booklets , forms, blanks j .1472 

2. Citizenship 

3. Immigra tion 

4. Travel 

5. Other 

II. F ORMS FILLED 



Cti 




M 




Eh 


3 


w 


< 


o 


Eh 


& 


O 


o 


Eh 



23. Other notarial 
IV. OTHER SERVICES 



V. INTERVIEW 




6. 1-485 Registry, 

7. 1-485 Sec. 245 

8. N-300_ 

9. N-400 

10. N-402 

11. M-600 

12. N-585_ 

13. Other Natur, Forms' 

14. 1-130 

15. 1-131 



16. Other Bnmig, Forms ~1144 f 

i7- AR-n ZT^M^ 

18. 1-90 

19. 1-53 



III. EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 

20. Affidavit of support 

21. Affidavit of facts 



22. Certificate of Identity" 



24. Change of Status (Cards).. 382 

25. Appearance at Heari:igs__ 133 

26. Interpretation & Trans. j_l/^o3 

27. Letters 

28. Other 



^ • 386 ! "424 j 186 

28 ! 10 



29. Newcomer Interview_ _j__lf>.42_ 

i 



263 | 



T T A I 3 



|24 ? 423 



3,597 



129_ 1 2, 537, 



4,796 '3,762 |5,432 |42,010 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 

6. 
7. 
8. 

9. 

10. 

11. 
12. 

13. 

H. 

15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 

19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23. 
24. 

25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 

29. 
30. 

31. 
32. 

33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 

49. 

50. 

51. 
52. 
53. 
54. 
55. 

ft. 



7/1/61 



Albania. 
Africa 



Nation ality an d Ethnic Statistics 



Armenia (R. 

Australia 

Austria 

Belgium 

Bulgaria 

Canada 



or 



T.) 



Central America 
China 



Czechoslovakia. 

Denmark 

Egypt 

Estonia 

Finland 

France 



Germany 

Great Britain, 

Greece 

Hung ar y 

Iceland 

India 



1185 



Indonesia, 

Iran 

Iraq 



Ireland. 
Israel_ 

Italy 

Japan 

Jordan_ 
Korea 



Latvia 

Lithuania 
Mexico __ 
Netherlands. 
New Zealand. 

Norway 

Pakistan 



Palestine 

Philippines. 
Poland 



i J ortugal_ 

Rumania 

South America, 

Spain 

Sweden 



Swit zerland __ 

Syria & Lebanon 

Turkey (Not Armenia 

Trieste 

Ukr a in e 

United States 

"Jest Indies 

Yugoslavia 

Other Countries 
Cuba 



•BOSTON 



J FALL 
j RIVER 



3K 



6/30/62 
LING-! W0R- 



LAWRENCEl 



FI T ^ 



,D 



CESTSR 



.24. 



i 
i 
j — ... 



1 



125 



87 



2 



_49_ 



16 



109 



- i 



108 



12. 



- i 



JL 



157 



15 



3L 



20 



16 



31. 



27 



_l_ 



11 



10 



Ik. 



2. 



313 1 



156 



704 



604 



586. 






416 



111 



- i 



8 



13 



159 



34! 



71 



11 



14 



11 



6 



61 



1 



4 



8 



2L 



71 



5 i 



27 



77 



- i 



181 



_2 

66 



347 



,645 



64 

89 



185 



166 



T— 

— ) 

st 

-r- 
i 



11 



94 



60 



79 



±: 



59 



249 



19P 
180 



.42_U 



/ Q/ 



111 



.04 



206 
11 



245 



104 



1 



12. 



11_ 



76 



31 



1430 



—51 

5469 



7Z 



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11 



51 



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61 



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12 



11 



9. 



1 



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7 



17-j- 
7-4- 



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fq 



& 



2Z.0 



167. 



71 



i 
— -i- 



«1Q 

1085 



27 



11 ! 



491 

122 



1287 



5P_ 



20 



20 



71 



1 



31. 



121 



18 i 



12 



298 



11 



m. 



11L 



_ i 



114. 



22 



8 



i 

-4- 
_ I 



A. 



2 
11 



10 



14. 



62 



12 



.-11 
276 



1092 



528 



37 



483 



105 



52 



72 



171 



214 



1 



36 



(A 







-111 



876 



90 



1 



75 



j — , 



I 



27 



15 



1 



72 



9 



A. 



~j_ 

167 
2003 



14 



8 



j 



12. 



30' 



o 



220 



473 






79 



°1 



_-i 



-- i 



1. 



41 



54 



21 



11 



7 



7 



21 



3 



3 

ii 



. 15i_J2. 



o 



21: 



48 



51 



- L 



2, 



20 



46 



— i 



28 



11 



46, 



39. 



JS3. 



1 



101 



674 



106 



213 



65 



131 i 

1060 



7 



4 



17 



-21 



2Q 



9 



TOTALS 



222 



144 



9 



31 



11 



m. 



151 



29 



5181 



388 



686 



84 

. 74 
165 



_44_ 
179._. 



395. 



1652 



1322 



2179. 



„__161 



Q 



182 



129 



106 



..._45_. 
1211 



„._26_. 
8311 



261 



77 



110 



151. 

469- 



129_ 



205. 



11 



167 



27 



110 



334 



2254 



-J21SL 



67 



661 



145 



111 



Q 



2. 



528 



304 



J. 



il_. 



in 



4819 



1260 



150 



2' 
10iE 



>0 



TOTALS 



24,423 3,597 



4,796 



3,762 5,432 42,010 



1 § 

Fiscal Year Ending 6/30/62^ 

o 

PQ 

L C 
/ bington 4 


hh: « 

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Pc, HH 

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O 
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Act on 


24- 

■ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24 


Acushnet 




'44 


- 


- 





44 


Adams 


14' 


i 


- 


5 


19 


Agawam 


t 


- 


57' 


- 


57 


Amesbury 


12 


- 


15 


- 


27 


Amherst 


4 


- 


12 


- 


16 


And over 


20 


- 


89 


- 


- 


109 


Arlington 


382 


- ■ 


- 


- 


- 


382 


Ashland 


5 




- 


- 


- 


5 


Athol 


3 


- 


- 


- 


2 


5 


Attleboro 


y 


88 ; 


"" 


- 


- 


97 


Auburn 


2 


- 


- 


118 


120 


Avon 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Ayer 


GO 


- 


6 


- 


2 


88 


Barnstable 


16 


26 




_ 


— 


42 


Barre 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


5 


Bedford 


42 


•"■ 


- 


- 


- 


42 


Be 1 c he r t own 


~ i 


- 


2 


— 


2 


Bellingham 


21 ! 




- 


- 


- 


21 


Belmont 


248' : 


- 


32 


- 


- 


280 


Berkley 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Beverly 


76 


- 


- 


- 


- 


76 


Blllerica 


7" 23 


- 


3 


- 


- 


26 


Elackstone 


i 


— 1 


- 


. - 


1 


1 


Bolton 


-,.,,. . k 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Boston 


10,508 


- 


85 


2 


"2U 10,615 


Boiurne 


13 1 


22 


- 


- 


- 


35 


Boxf ord 


3 


■■•_ o 
'i 


- 


- 


5 


Boylston 


4 


_ i _ 


- 


• 32 


36 


Braintree 


92 


- \ - 


- 


- 


92 


Brewster 


11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


Bridgev/ater 


9 


5 


" I 


- 


14 


Brimfield 


4 


- 


1 
j 


- 


4 


Brockton 


151 


- 




- 


151 


Brooki'ield' 


- 




1 _ i 


- 


5 


5 


Brookline 


743 


- 


4 


- 


3 


750 


Burlington 


26 


- 


1 


- 


- 


27 


Cambridge 


1562 


2 


i 

i 


mm 


1,564 


Canton 


37 


- 


■ 


- 


37 


Carlisle 


1 


~ 


3 


- 


- 


4 


. Charlton 


- 


- 


- 


- 


26 


26 


Chatham 


2 


3 


- 


- 


5 


Chelmsford 


3 


- 


.__25__ 


- 


- 


28 


Chelsea 


330 


... . 


- 


- 


338 


Chester 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Chicopee 


21 


- 


.. 


508 


- 


529 


Clinton 


1 


- 


- 


85 


86 


Cohasset 


8 


i 

t 


- 


- 


- 


8 



Concord 


525 

D 

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CO 

. 

PQ 

44 ' 


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P*H 



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9 


a 

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CO 

1 


CO 

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44 


Dalton 


•_ 


_ 


_ 


9 


Danvers 


45 


- 


12 "T 


- 


- 


57 


Dartmouth 


1 


105 


- 


- 


- 


106 


Dedham , 


99 


- 


- 


- 


- 


99 


Deerf ield 


5 


- 


- 


1 


6 


Dennis 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Dighton 


- 


S 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Douglas 


1 


- 


- 




11 


12 


Dover 


& 1 


- 




5 


Dracut 


2 | -~ 4 


60 


- ' 


62 


Dudley 


- 


- 


- 


1 


79_ 


79 


Duxbury 


21 


- j 




21 


.Cast Bridgewater 


11 


t 


_ 


H 


11 


East Brookfield 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


East Longmeadow 


1 


- 


__._. 


21 


- 


22 


Eastham 


7 




- 


^ _ " 


7 


Easthampton 


2 


- 


"21" r -~"~ n 


24 


Easton 


24 


- 


- 




24 


Essex 


7 


- 






7 


Everett 


482 H 


" 1 | 


. - 


487 


Falrhaven 


2 


■ "i — ■■ 
62 j. :.- 


4 


_ 


68 


Fall River 


14 


1740 


- 


- 


- 


1,754 


Falmouth 


46 


105 


- 


! 2 


- 


153 


I'itchburg 


33 


- 


- 




62 


100 


Florida 


1 


— 1 — 





- 


1 


Foxborough 


34 


- 


- 


- 


34 


Frammgham 


197 


- 


- 


- 


'2 


199 


Franklin 


49 


- i - 


- 


- 


49 


Freetown 


1 


1 I ' - 


- 


- 


2 


Gardner 


8 


!" 

1 


_ 


55 


63 


Georgetown 


4 


~ 


2 


- 


- 


6 


Gloucester 


117 


- 


5 


- 


- 


122 


Grafton 


_ 


— 


_ 


— 


77 


77 


Granby 


— 




Z 


16 


— 


16 


Greenfield 


8 


16 


- 


24 


Groton 


8 i 


2 


- 


3 


.13 


Groveland 


5 


- 


21 


- 


j, . .... _, 


26 


Hadley 





i „» 


— 


4 


. 


7 


Hamilton 


' "23" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23 


Hampden 


- 




4 


- 


4 


Hanover 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Hanson 


33 


- 


- 




- 


33 


Hardwick 


- 


- 


- 




1 


1 


Harvard 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Harwich 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 



Hatfi.eld.__ 
Haverhill 
H Ingham 

Holbropk 
TJ old.en : 



o 

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49 



> 



$ 



f^ pel 



29 



I 



Ho-lliston. 

Holyoke ~ 

Hope dale 
Hop kin ton 
Hudson 
Hull 



Huntington 



11 



J7_ 
'12 
2 



20 



45 



42 



Ipswich 

Kingston 



42 



Lakeville 

Lancaster 
Lanesborough" 

Lawrence_ " 

Lee_ 

Leicester^ 
Lenox 



Leominster 

Lexington_J 

Lincoln 



Littleton 
Longmeadow 

Lowell 
Ludlow 



Lunenburg 
Lynn 



Lyhnf ield' 
Malde'H 



mchester 
•Mansfield ' 
Marble head' 

Marion 



1 



1 



17 



23 



2 



89 



20 



44 






4iiL 



347 
• -'9 



37- 



-I- 



20 



.._<__ 



Marlborough 
Marshfield 



Ma t tap oi sett" 
Maynar d " 
Medfielc T 
Medford_ 

Medway 
Melrose 
MerrimacT" 
Met hue n 



59 
7 



A? 
20; 



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36 

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511 
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11 

"_88 

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57 




42 



1 



56 



2 
2,273 



89 
2 



46 
89 



20 



_6 
24 



1,106 



T2B 



1 



444 

18 



4 






14 
297 



355 



9 



57 



41 



14 



55 



20 



25 



34 

56 

391 

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98 

17 

306 



Miduleborough 


'3 

o 

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pq 

24 


9 


O 


fas 

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8 


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L'idcJleton 


59 


- 




- 


- 


64 


Milford 


21 


- 


~ 


• 3 


124 


148 


Mlllbury 


- 


- 


- 


- 


69 


69 


Millis 


12 


- 


- 


i ~ 


- 


12 


Milton 


81 


- 


- 


j 


- 


81 


Monson 


4 


- 


- 


! 10 


- 


14 


Montague 


1 


- 


- 


! 6 


- 


7 


Nahant 


22 


M 


_ 


1 
I 


- 


22 


Nantucket 


2 


- 


- 


| 


- 


2 


Natick 


137 


- 


- 


- 


- 


137 


Needham 


116 


- 


- 


2 


- 


118 


New Bedford 


28 


s>69 


- 


- 


- 


997 


Newbury 


2 


- 


5 


- 


- 


7 


Newbury port 


12 


- 


4 


- 


- 


16 


Newton 


754 


- 


4 


- 


- 


758 


Norfolk 


2~ 




- 


- 


- 


2 


North Adams 


5 


- 


- 


9 


3 


17 


North Andover 


14 




91 


- 


- 


105 


North Attleborough 


7 i 


10 


- 


- 


- 


17 


North Brookfield 


_ 


I 


- 


- 


5 


5 


North Reading 


11 


- 1 

i 


2 


- 


- 


13 


Northampton 


7 


1 

1 


- 


39 


- 


46 


Northborough 


2 


„. 


- 


- 


50 


52 


Nort abridge 


1 


- 


- 


- 


40 


41 


Norton 


3 


10 


- 


- 




13 


Nor we 11 


2 


- 


i 


- 


- 


2 


Norwood 


155 


- 


*" i 


- 


- 


155 


Orange 


1 


mm 


1 

i 

i 


^ 


mm 


1 


Orleans 


5 


- 




- 


- 


5 


Otis 


- 


- 


i 

- i 


4 


- 


4 


Oxford 


- 


- 




- 


71 


71 


Palmer 


11 


mm 


i 

_ i 


25 


mi 


36 


Paxton 




- 


» 


- 


63 


63 


Peabody i 


124 


- 


23 1 


- 


- 


147 


Pelham : 


- 


- 


- i 


2 


- 


2 


Pembroke 


32 




- 


- 


- 


32 


Pepperell 




- 


2 


- 


- 


5 


Pittsf ield 


9 


- 


- 


14 


- 


23 


Plainville 


2 




- 


- 


- 


2 


Plymouth 


22 


1 


_ i 


- 


- 


23 


Princeton 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Qulncy 


457 


"■ 


M 


a. 


2 


459 



• i 
fervWlph 


! 

I 
i 
i 
1 


!25 
O 

EH 

co 
o 
pq 

f7 


fa 

i— 1 


o 

1 

... <5 

J - 


i— i 
O 

t-H 
CO 


w 

EH 

. CO 

■o 


n 

8 

EH 

67 


Eaynfajara 


— 


1 


i , 


— 


— 


1 


Read ihg 


47 




■•! 3 


— 


— 


50 


Rehoboth 


— 


7 




- ■ — 


- 


7 


Revere J228 




-! 3 


- 


— 


231 


Rochester 


— 


8 




- 


- 


8 


Rockland 


19 


— 


— 


— 


- 


l ? 


Rockport 


h 


. — 




— 


— 


4 


Rowley 


— 


_j . .j, 


6 


• 


■ -~_ 


6 


Russell 


■ — 


' r" 




••••&• 


— 


8 


Rutland 


■ 2 


1 _ 


_ 


' — 


36 


38 


Salem 


84 


* 


! 4 






88 


Salisbury 


2 


i 


; 10 


■-■— 


— 


12 


Sandwich 


.5 


-^ — ~ 


.!. _ j 




— . 


5 


Saugus 


te 




; - 




— 


^2 


Scituate 


58 




i 


— '_ 


— 


. 58 


Seekonk 


j . _ 


; 2 




- " 


— 


2 


Sharon 


43, 




j 


— 


— 


13 


Sheffield ...--.- 


" 1 ' ' 


i ■■• ' 




... 3 


- 


3 


She r horn 


16 




— 




— 


16 


Shirley 

Shrewsbury - 




!5, 




j 1 


— 


— 


6 


f :12 






— 


"'244 


256 


bnutesbury 


— 


— 


3 


- 


3 


b'omerset -r-Fl 


•'lo4 • 


— 




— 


Tot 


Somerville 1081" 


— 


4 


— 


— 


1,085 


South Had ley '•.-.• " 


■5 ' 


— 


— 


49 


— 


c ;;. 


Southampton 
Southborough 






""" 


— 


2 


— 


2 




it 


— 


— 


— 


1 


5 


Southbridge 


17 


- j 


- 


— 


120 


137 


Southwick 
Spencer 




1 


1 


— 


20 


— 


21 




g 


— 


— 


— 


42 


50 


Springfield 


39 


— 


— 


>093 


— 


2,132 


Sterling 


— 


— 


— 


— 


5 


5 


S Rockbridge 


4 


— 


. 


— 


— 


4 


Stoneham 


56 


— 1 


3 


— 


— 


59 


Stoughton 


_i! 


■■■--■■ I 




— 


— 


51 


Stow 


l 




— 


■~ 


— ■* 


j. 


sturbridge 

Sudbury 

Sutton 




— 


"~ , 


— 


— 


3 


3 




10 




— 


— 


— 


10 




— 


— 


_ 


— 


2 


2 


owampscott^ 


46 


— 


_ 1 


— 


— 


46 


Sv/ansea 


1 


68 


_ i 
i 


— 


— 


69 


Taunton 


13 


130 


- i 






143 


Tewksbury 


8 




13 


— 


— 


21 


Tisbury 
Topsfield 
Towns end 




1 


— 




— 


— 


1 




4 




— 


— 


— 


4 




3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


iyngs borough 
Tyringham 




i 


— 


2 


— 


— 


7 




i 


. . ,- j 




— 


— 


1 



Uxbri'i ;e 


3 
tH 

CO 

O 

pq 
10 


►-} on 

-XH H 


H 

O 

1 

J 


Q 

H 

o 

I— 1 

Pi 

CO 


a 

E-t 
CO 

H 
o 

p 
3 


CO 

Eh 
O 

EH 

13 


i Icefield 


84 


_ 


15 


_ 




99 


''ales 


— 


— 




2 


— 


2 


Jalpole 


44 


— 


— 


- 


— 


44 


altham 


566 


— 


- 


- 


— 


566 


'fare 


— 


— 


— 


10 


— 


10 


: areham 


10 


2 


— 


— 


- 


12 


'arren 


— 


— 


- 


2 


1 


3 


arwick 


JL 


— 


— 


— 


— 


7 


.'/atertown 


528 


— 


1 


— 





_ 522 


'ayland 


15 


— 


- 


— 


— ' 


15 


Webster 


■16 


— 


- 


131 


147 


'ellesley 


1 132 


— 


— 




132 


ellfleet 


1 3 - 


- 


- 


— 


4 


Wenham 


1 


— 




— 


1 


est Boylston 


— 


— 


— 


— 


70 


70 


' f est Brid^ewater 


5 


— 


- 


- 


— 


_1 


r est Brookfield 


— 


— 


— 


— 


8 


8 


; est Springfield 


— 


— 


— 


103 


— 


103 


West borough 


— 


— 


— 


5 


35 


40 


''estfield 


l 


— 


— 


65 




66 


estford 


7 1 


2.5 




— 


^2 


Westminster 




— 




— 




5 


/est on 


51 


— 


— 


— 




51 


West port - 




l£ 


- 


— 


— 


:i6 


v'estwood- 


17 


— 


— 


— 


— 


'.'? 


eymouth- 


83 


— 


— 


- 


- 


C3 


Whately 


1 


— 


— 


"* "!^ 


— ' 


1 


Whitman 


13 


— 


— 


— 


— 


13 


'filbraham 




— 


— 


17 


— 


IV 


ill iams town 


29 


— 


— 


23 


— 


^p 


Wilmington 


37 


— 


1 






J}8 


'. mchendon 


10 


— 


— 


- 


- 


10 


Winchester 


81 


— 


7 


— 


— 


88 


■'inthrop 


61 


— 




— 


— 


61 


■oburn 
Worcester 


102 


— 


— 


— ■ 


— 


102 


70 


5 


1 


3 


3412 


3. 491 


-/rent ham 


16 




i 




- 


16 


Yarmouth 


2 


1 


r " * 


j _ 




! 

5 


Out of State 


397 




94 


84 


11. 


«6 


Totals: 


24,423 


3.597 


*,7# 


3.762 


5.432 


42,010 




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